Supreme Court promoting Police State

Excerpts from an article by John W. Whitehead, at LewRockwell.com:

A review of the Supreme Court’s rulings over the past 10 years, including some critical ones this term, reveals a startling and steady trend towards pro-police state rulings by an institution concerned more with establishing order and protecting government agents than with upholding the rights enshrined in the Constitution.

Police officers can use lethal force in car chases without fear of lawsuits. In Plumhoff v. Rickard (2014), the Court declared that police officers who used deadly force to terminate a car chase were immune from a lawsuit

Police officers can stop cars based only on “anonymous” tips.

Secret Service agents are not accountable for their actions, as long as they’re done in the name of security.

Citizens only have a right to remain silent if they assert it.

Police have free reign to use drug-sniffing dogs as “search warrants on leashes,” justifying any and all police searches of vehicles stopped on the roadside. In Florida v. Harris (2013), a unanimous Court determined that police officers may use highly unreliable drug-sniffing dogs to conduct warrantless searches of cars during routine traffic stops.

Police can forcibly take your DNA, whether or not you’ve been convicted of a crime.

Police can stop, search, question and profile citizens and non-citizens alike.

Police can subject Americans to virtual strip searches, no matter the “offense.”

Police can break into homes without a warrant, even if it’s the wrong home. In an 8-1 ruling in Kentucky v. King (2011), the Supreme Court placed their trust in the discretion of police officers, rather than in the dictates of the Constitution, when they gave police greater leeway to break into homes or apartments without a warrant.

It’s a crime to not identify yourself when a policeman asks your name.

The cases the Supreme Court refuses to hear, allowing lower court judgments to stand, are almost as critical as the ones they rule on.

Legally owning a firearm is enough to justify a no-knock raid by police.

The military can arrest and detain American citizens.

Police officers who don’t know their actions violate the law aren’t guilty of breaking the law. The Supreme Court let stand a Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals decision in Brooks v. City of Seattle (2012) in which police officers who clearly used excessive force when they repeatedly tasered a pregnant woman during a routine traffic stop were granted immunity from prosecution.

Keep in mind that in former regimes such as Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union, the complicity of the courts was the final piece to fall into place before the totalitarian beast stepped out of the shadows and into the light.

It brings to mind Chief Justice Roberts’ last-minute decision to vote in favor of obamacare. Larry Klayman believes Roberts was blackmailed by the NSA. He states:

But let’s take this possibility: Why did Chief Justice Roberts at the eleventh hour change his decision?…Is it something that was dug up on him by the NSA or the CIA? Was that used against him to blackmail him?

These are the kinds of things [the government is doing], and that’s why it’s so scary what’s going on with the NSA and the CIA.

Details of all the laws mentioned by Whitehead are included in his article at LewRockwell.com.

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